Faculty Notes

Chinese

Neil Kubler: "Basic Spoken Chinese" out in final form

Posted May 6, 2011: After 19 years of preparation, field-testing, and revision, Professor Neil Kubler’s Basic Spoken Chinese was put out in final form by Tuttle Publishing in spring 2011. This complete course in elementary spoken Chinese, which includes a DVD with learning software and an hour of videos as well as a CD containing more »

Neil Kubler: Publishes "A Synchronic and Diachronic Study of the Southern Min Dialects of Penghu"

Posted May 6, 2011: In fall 2010, Neil Kubler, Stanfield Professor of Asian Studies, published “A Synchronic and Diachronic Study of the Southern Min Dialects of Penghu: A Progress Report,” which presents some of his initial findings from a two-generational study of the Chinese dialects of the Penghu Archipelago, located between Taiwan and mainland China. more »

Neil Kubler: Publishes 500 Common Chinese Idioms

Neil Kubler recently published 500 Common Chinese Idioms: An Annotated Frequency Dictionary.

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Christopher Nugent: Publishes "Manifest in Words, Written on Paper: Producing and Circulating Poetry in Tang Dynasty China"

Posted Dec. 14, 2010: Christopher Nugent, Associate Professor of Chinese, has published “Manifest in Words, Written on Paper: Producing and Circulating Poetry in Tang Dynasty China” (Harvard University Asia Center). The book focuses on the ways in which medieval Chinese poets and their audiences composed and transmitted poetry in both oral and written forms, set more »

Neil Kubler: Linguistics and Chinese as a Second Language

Posted May 28:  In fall 2009, Neil Kubler, Dept. of Asian Studies, published “How to Decide on Difficulty Levels in Chinese: ‘Hard’ vs. ‘Easy’” in Linguistics and Chinese as a Second Language, ed. by Weiping Wu and Zhaolin Li, Hong Kong University Press, Hong Kong, p. 41-51. http://www.williams.edu/Asian/chinese/kubler.html

Neil Kubler: Directing Harvard-Beijing Academy

Neil Kubler, Professor of Asian Studies, is spending the summer in Beijing, where he is directing Harvard’s summer Chinese language program, known as Harvard-Beijing Academy. He’s in charge of a total of 81 students, almost all from Harvard or Yale, plus 44 local instructors, all of whom are keeping him quite busy. On weekends he more »